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Tag Archives: Whangarei

Whanau Travel Taranaki to Cape Reinga to Share Experiences with Suicide

Whānau on Bus Trip to Heal Issues of Suicide

Five Māori families affected by the suicide of a family member are participating in a unique project in which they will travel on a bus from marae to marae, making their way from Taranaki to Cape Reinga. The journey begins today and lasts for one week.

At each stop, a new family will join the journey and at each marae the families will take part in wānanga sessions guided by Māori psychologist and filmmaker Paora Joseph. In the wānanga, the families will share their personal struggles and stories about loved ones who have committed suicide. Other families in each area are invited to participate.

The wānanga and the journey will become part of a film, titled Maui’s Hook, for which Joseph will also serve as director.

Following a similar “journey of discovery and resolution” format to his powerful documentary Tātarakihi: The Children of Parihaka, this documentary/drama feature film will chronicle the healing journey of the five families.

Drama sequences will be co-directed with Paora Joseph by Alyx Duncan (The Red House) and the cinematographer is Maria Ines Manchego, known for her work on Florian Habicht’s Pulp. Maui’s Hook is produced by Quinton Hita and Karen Waaka-Tibble from Kura Productions Ltd, with support from Te Rau Matatini – National Suicide Prevention Strategy, Te Puni Kokiri and the TSB Bank with Te Hurihanga Trust.

The trip journey starts in Taranaki and stops along the way in some of the areas worst affected by whakamomori (suicide) – Whanganui, Rotorua, Auckland, Whangarei – Northland, before arriving at Cape Reinga, the final departing place of spirits.

Continue Reading at Scoop.co.nz

Victory Parade Raises Funds for Engage Aotearoa

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People from across Northland came together to stage the Victory Fashion Parade and raise funds for Engage Aotearoa on Saturday the 28th of September at Toll Stadium. The Victory Parade was the brainchild of Whangarei local, Vicky Flavell, who joined forces with Karma Flavell and Luanne Wedgwood to create an event that would give local Northland fashion designers a chance to show their creative work and connect with their community. Vicky and Karma have both walked their own journeys to recovery from the experience of being suicidal and they decided to use The Victory Parade as a way to raise money for suicide prevention. When Engage Aotearoa and Key to Life took the Community Korero suicide prevention talks to Whangarei in May, The Victory Parade team kindly offered to donate all of the proceeds from the event to Engage Aotearoa.

On the 28th of September when Engage Aotearoa representatives arrived at Toll Stadium, people were already gathering at the entrance to buy last-minute tickets and get a spot at the front of the queue. Around 110 people turned out for the show, emceed by Vince Cocurullo. The night kicked-off with a rendition of Blindspott’s ‘Phlex’ from local youth band W.I.S and a speech from Engage Aotearoa’s service director, Miriam Larsen-Barr; an opportunity to thank everyone involved and share information about where people feeling suicidal can find help. Then came the catwalk shows. As well as showcasing Northland designers, The Victory Parade displayed the diversity of the community in a positive way; the models included a range of body-shapes, ages and ethnicities all looking incredibly comfortable in their skin.

Engage Aotearoa and Community Mental-Health Resources Trust (CMHRT) offer their heartfelt thanks to everyone involved in The Victory Parade, from the organisers to those who provided free or subsidised resources, sponsored costs, donated time, presented a collection, modelled on the runway, performed in one of the dances or attended the show. The event was a resounding success and each and every one of the people involved was part of making that happen.

Victory_Thankyou_Poster

The team would especially like to thank Vicky Flavell and her power-duo, Karma Flavell and Luanne Wedgwood for bringing it all together.  

Proceeds raised by The Victory Parade will be used to print more copies of The Butterfly Diaries.

The Victory Parade Organisers:
Vicky Flavell, Karma Flavell and Luanne Wedgwood.

The Victory Parade Designers:
Tracey Davies, Samantha Wakelin, Neisha Maree, Charlotte Davidson, Julie Pyle, Simon Richards, Mercy, Tracey Harvey, Jessie Rose, Krakens Lair and the Steampunk crew.

The Victory Parade Sponsors:
Absolute Caterers, Ashleigh Higgins, Bev Redwood, Blooms Florist, Kani Krew, Otaika Pharmacy, People Potential, QVS, Sharon Gibson Life and Style, Toll Stadium, Tru Colours Ltd and Verna Flavell

The Victory Fashion Parade | Whangarei | 28 Sep 2013

When Engage Aotearoa visited Whangarei with Mike King and Key to Life for the Community Korero earlier this year, the team met a wonderful woman named Vicky Flavell who wanted to put her passion for fashion design behind a good cause.

The Victory Fashion Parade brings together designers from the Far North for a night of style, with all proceeds going towards Engage Aotearoa’s project to get printed copies of The Community Resources Directory and The Butterfly Diaries out into communities across the country. Making help easy to find when people are struggling is an important part of preventing suicide in NZ. Now, the people of Whangarei can help make that happen just by enjoying a good night out with their friends.

  • 6 pm, Saturday 28 September 2013
  • Toll Stadium, Whangarei
  • Tickets $40
  • Contact no. 021 144 6080

Victory Fashion Parade Whangarei 28 Sep 2013

 

 

Panui from NZ Maori Council | Nationwide Hui | Now to 18 Sep 2013

A Letter from the New Zealand Maori Council, Te Kaunihera Maori o Aotearoa

26 August 2013

He Panui

Tena koutou

Nationwide consultation on the Crown’s review of the Community Development Act commences in September 2013, at a time when the New Zealand Māori Council is challenging Crown action on a number of issues vital to Māori rights and interests. These include rights to water, to the radio spectrum, to the benefits of the Crown Forestry Rental Trust, to citizenship and electoral rights and to provide safety to Māori communities through the Māori Wardens.

The Council is concerned that the timing of the consultation process when these cases are pending and the exclusion of the Council as a partner in the consultation process puts at risk the Council’s work of advocating for and protecting Māori communities. Details about the Council’s current and past action to protect Māori rights and interests are attached to this letter.

This letter encourages you either to attend the consultation hui www.tpk.govt.nz/en/consultation/mcda/ or to relay your views to the Council Secretary, Karen Waterreus (karen@maoricouncil.com).

The unique feature of Council is its statutory mandate to work for and on behalf of the greater Māori community. Council works for all Māori, whoever we are and wherever we are. Council still has a job to do to protect Māori rights and interests and must remain in existence.

Ngā mihi
Maanu Paul, Co-Chair and Sir Edward Taihākurei Durie, Co-Chair
The New Zealand Maori Council
Te Kaunihera Maori o Aotearoa

Upcoming Hui Dates

  • Whangārei Wed 4 September 8.30-10.30am Whangarei Terenga Paraoa Marae Porowini Avenue, Whangarei
  • Auckland (North) Wed 4 September 4-6pm Orakei Marae 59b Kitemoana Street, Orakei
  • Auckland (South) Thurs 5 September 8.30-10.30am Te Puea Marae 41 Miro Road, Mangere
  • Palmerston North Thurs 5 September 4-6pm Kingsgate Hotel 110 Fitzherbert Avenue, Palmerston North
  • Whanganui Tues 10 September 8-10am Te Taura Whiri Building (TPK Office) 357 Victoria Avenue, Whanganui
  • New Plymouth Tues 10 September 2-4pm Mururaupatu Marae Te Arei Road, R.D. 3
  • Hamilton Weds 11 September 8-10am Rangiaowhia Marae TWOA, Raroera Campus, Te Rapa
  • Rotorua Weds 11 September 1-3pm Te Papaiouru Marae Ohinemutu
  • Christchurch Thurs 12 September 8-10am Twiggers Addington Raceway
  • Nelson Thurs 12 September 2.30-4.30am Whakatu Marae 99 Atawhai Drive, Nelson
  • Lower Hutt Tues 17 September 9-11am Waiwhetu Marae Puketapu Grove, Waiwhetu, Lower Hutt
  • Porirua Tues 17 September 2-4pm Takapuwahia Marae 2 Nohorua Street, Porirua
  • Dunedin Weds 18 September 8-10am Arai I te Uru Marae 24 Shetland Street,

 

Outcomes from Mike King’s Community Korero in Whangarei

Report: Mike King’s: “Community Korero” – Depression & Suicide Prevention

Feedback report by Aorangi Kawiti, Mana

Whangarei, Monday 8th– 9th April 2013

Support Team: Whangarei Coordinator: Aorangi Kawiti (Mana), Isha Waetford (Mana Rangatahi) Deeanna Matiu (Mana Admin Work Experience), Marama & Rowan Waddell, Janey Tana (Mana Wahine- Tane), Hone Tana (Man Alive), Shahni Bright (The Pulse), Arthur Harawira (Mana Kaikohe)

More than 150 people from across the Whangarei community, education, health, development & social sectors flocked to hear Mike King’s brutally honest korero on his very personal experience with depression, drug & alcohol addiction & suicide. Each of the three venues packed to capacity, The Hut at The Pulse, the May Bain Room at the Central Library and the Mana office, despite late changes in venues and media reports.

Sharing his story helped others to open up and share their story, identifying with someone who’s been there and no longer feeling so alone. Accepting himself, after a lifetime of longing for the acceptance of his father and everyone else when he couldn’t get that, is pivotal to who he is today and his ability to have a conversation about a subject as serious as suicide and depression that most are afraid to bring up, in case somehow talking about it may spread the contagion, bring more suicide or increase depression. Guess what? Talking freely about depression and suicide in a safe and caring environment is amazingly liberating and invigorating. Sharing the grief of suicide is healing, releasing us from blame and guilt when we understand we have done all we could to prevent it and accepting that despite our best efforts we may not have been able to stop someone we love dying through suicide. Empowering us beyond this is the hope that propels to do all that we can to save a life from suicide, starting with the conversation: “Are you okay?” “Do you need help?” “I’m here for you” “I care about you”…then staying till they get the help they need. We need to believe people when they let us know they are suffering. We can make it easier for people to talk to us, by being more open about ourselves and our own struggles.

Humour by nature, as a survival technique and a tool of communication, is huge in Mike’s story, opening a window into his life that is warmly empathetic of young fullas growing up and easily related to. Mike’s the ambassador for Key to Life, the charity behind The Nutters Club. The feminine view is well represented by Miriam Larsen-Barr, the Korero coordinator, Engage Aotearoa Service Director, www.engagenz.co.nz website creator and administrator with a handy MA (1st Class Honours) in Psychology. Youth team member Tai Tupou, Head Trainer/ Director of RIPPED Training, No1 Boot Camp Trainer 2012 comes highly recommended by the youth in the audience, with a good dose of coconut oil as a natural remedy for depression (also recommended in the korero).

Here is a list of recommendations that came from the discussions at the Korero 

1.      Talk about our problems with each other so we aren’t dealing with the tough stuff alone

2.      Take people’s feelings seriously – remember that young people have the same emotions as adults

3.      Don’t be afraid to ask someone if they are okay – we don’t need to fix their problem, we just need to listen and show we care

4.      It is okay to come right out and say ‘are you feeling suicidal?’ – asking this question does not put ideas into someone’s head, it gives them an opportunity to tell us about how they are feeling. Suicidal feelings are hard to talk about and asking the question makes it easier to do.

5.      Talking about why people feel suicidal is important, talking about how people attempt suicide is unhelpful as it accidentally shares methods – if someone is suicidal though, we need to know enough about what they are thinking to keep them safe and protect them from having the means to follow through on any plans they might have to act on their thoughts, so it is okay to ask people whether they have a plan and what that plan is

6.      Talk and listen to our own children the same way we would our friend’s children: When we talk to our children, listen to their hurt and try to get past our own hurt as parents that we have not protected them from everything

7.      Talk more about our own problems and how we get through them – when we are real it makes it okay for other people to be real, but silence brings shame and increases stigma

8.      We need to validate each other more, look for the positives in each other and reflect them back

9.      Be aware that antidepressant medication can increase suicidal thoughts and feelings for a time and report to your doctor if you notice this

10.  For people who are suicidal and depressed, nutrition can be really important. A number of Korero participants mentioned that eating coconut oil helped them improve their moods.

11.  Parents and teachers need to be on Facebook so they can respond to risky posts and offer their support – young people often say things on Facebook that they can’t say in person. Be there.

12.  We need to normalise mental-health problems and reduce stigma so people understand these problems are common and that they can recover from them.

13.  We need to make it okay to make mistakes

14.  We need to stop thinking it is someone else’s problem to provide the support, that it is not our business and that what happens in a family should stay in the family – we are smaller families inside the one bigger family of our community, it is okay to help people from other families or to seek help from people in other families

15.  We need to give ourselves permission and our children permission to take our masks off, ask for help and show we care.

16.  Be persistent – if we feel suicidal we need to keep asking for help until we find the person who can give it to us. If we know someone is feeling suicidal we need to keep offering our support until they are able to accept it.

17.  Get help – there are heaps of supports available from counselling and therapy to phone lines like 0508 TAUTOKO, youth groups like The RAID Movement and whanau supports like Supporting Families.

18.  Support needs to be individualised and take wairua/spirituality into account for people who have a spiritual perspective

19.  Find and share information about mental health, suicide and recovery resources – a lot of the info that was available at the Korero resource table is available online at the National Depression Initiative, The Low Down, The Mental-Health Foundation and the EngageNZ websites.

20.  We all need to feel accepted and included. Let’s accept and include each other more. What we do makes a difference.

Comments from Participants

“Your korero touched my heart.”

“I acknowledge your korero on suicide and you’re right, all the money in the world won’t fix it but talking will.”

“Tautoko your mahi and korero. Yes! We need to talk, hug, awhi etc to get the message out – “you are not alone”.”

“Absolutely fantastic korero, learned so much and totally believe sharing stories is a wonderful way of healing. I’m so glad our team attended.”

“The talk the other day was brilliant. Well really it was a discussion. It was very open, honest, inclusive and well worth taking the time to go to. Important things we got out of it are, talk, have a conversation, be yourself and know that you do not have the right to know if someone else likes you or not. Thanks very much I’m sure everyone took something useful away with them.”

Outcomes

Given all the shared conversations by people who care and the empathetic response of support from the community at this time when we are sadly aware of the deaths to suicide in Whangarei last year and increasingly over the past few years, it is with hope inspired by this presentation and the collective support it has received that we are glad to report some very real and positive results from this:

  1. Conversations were shared about depression, suicide and recovery in our community
  2. Conversations are continuing with whanau and community
  3. Increased information and awareness in the community (Community Resources Directory of recovery services online at EngageNZ, distributed at meetings for people to add to and have available in a prominent place at their service for people to access)
  4. Service providers and clinicians engaging to support whanau and community
  5. Survivors of Suicide Support Group, to meet monthly, for people who have lost someone to suicide, considered suicide and survived or are currently struggling with these feelings. We are engaged in planning and partnership activities to ensure this will be a safe and supportive group, with the intention of being able to begin in June or July.

Ma tatou tahi e awhi e hapai te kaupapa nei. Through all of us working together we share.

Report prepared by Aorangi Kawiti
Contact: kawiti.aorangi@gmail.com, 0226202262

Mike King Korero to Get Whangarei Talking About Suicide

Media Release: Engage Aotearoa & The Key to Life Charitable Trust

For Immediate Release: 01/04/2013 | Updated 5/04/2013
_ _ _

Mike King’s Community Korero will hit Whangarei from the 8th to the 9th of April to throw solutions at the problem of suicide, with a series of public seminars. NZ has one of the highest suicide rates in the developed world, especially among older people and youth. Estimates suggest that 1 in 6 New Zealanders have suicidal thoughts every year. As Mike King puts it “The Korero encourages people to help fight suicide by talking and supporting each other rather than taking their own lives. Silence is not the solution.” Rather than simply telling people they need to talk, King leads by example; Through sharing his own story, he opens the way for community members to share theirs.

CommunityKoreroPosterWhangareiV5

In the Community Korero, comedian Mike King gets straight up about his battle with depression, addiction and his ongoing journey back to recovery, including the mistakes he made along the way. This is a not-to-be-missed chance for communities to come together and explore how to support our youth and each other to survive and thrive. People can ask the questions they have always wanted to ask during a Q & A session at the end of the talk where Mike is joined by Engage Aotearoa service director Miriam Larsen-Barr, who also has a lived experience of recovery from being suicidal. Together they are an example of how the issue of suicide can affect anyone, Pakeha and Maori, men and women, young people and adults.

The Q & A is a chance for local professionals, parents, teachers and people with personal experience of these issues to discuss how we as individuals and communities can use our experiences to prevent suicide. Those with questions can ask them and those with knowledge can share it. Feedback from the Community Korero in Kaitaia included comments like “loved it”, “amazing evening, Mike opening his heart and bringing this community together” and “we should have another one I reckon.”

The initiative hopes to reach local schools in Whangarei in the future, through Cool to Korero, a special student-centred session that gives kids a chance to seek help and empowers youth to lead the way in creating supportive school and community environments. At least 20 students came forward to seek help for active suicidal thoughts after the Kaitaia and Taipa talks and were linked in with support.

Students commented “It was mint. I like how you approached the subject like not too serious and yeah, shot oi!”, “Thank you so much, words don’t suffice” and “you should come back mah gee!” Teachers commented “Thank you for giving our rangatahi options to stand up, speak up and seek help” and “I BET you have saved lives today.”

Community Korero is open to the public and a resource table provides plenty of take-home information about everything from suicidal thoughts and supporting someone who is suicidal to recovery and community services.  Local services are welcome to bring information to share with the community too – people can simply bring their materials along and add them to the table.

Larsen-Barr comments “suicide is a really hard issue in our communities. There are so many people who are prepared to help and who are already helping.  When our powers combine, I truly believe great things will happen. But first, we need to talk about it. Mike’s Korero creates a space to do that.

For more information visit www.engagenz.co.nz and click on Mike King Talks.

___ ENDS ___

Suicide Prevention Skills Workshop Whangarei 4-5 April 2013

ASIST Training Whangarei 

Venue: Pat Irvine Lounge- St Johns Church Centre, 149 Kamo Road, Whangarei.
Date/Time: April 4-5, 2013 from 8:30 am.

Lifeline Aotearoa’s Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST), is a two-day intensive, interactive and practical course designed to help community members:

  • Recognise suicidal signs through changes in behaviour
  • Confidently raise the issue of suicide
  • Know what to say and assess risk and safety needs
  • Know where to access further support and other professional assistance

The workshop is for all caregivers & Kaiawhina, any person in a position of trust. This includes professionals, paraprofessionals and lay people. It is suitable for mental health professionals, nurses, physicians, pharmacists,teachers, counsellors, youth workers, police and correctional staff, school support staff, clergy, and community volunteers.

Price: $340 (including GST) for the two day course (includes materials and refreshments).

A limited number of places are available at a subsidised rate for people from Maori/Pacific Island organisations, Students, or NGO organisations. For eligibility, contact Lifeline.

Dates/Times: (Participation in the full Two days is essential).
Thursday April 4th- 8.30am – 5pm.
Friday April 5th – 9am – 5pm.
Please Note: The workshop commences at 8.30am on the first day with a Whakatau/Karakia.

More info about ASSIST Training online here!

Nationwide Campaign Against Child Abuse in Aotearoa: Day of Action 13 March 2013

A Day in Action in Aoteroa” is the banner under which concerned community leaders, parents, grandparents, whānau and organisations are marching next Wednesday 13th March to combat child abuse throughout the country. A movement which started last month in Kaitāia has now gathered national support and momentum, with synchronised Hikoi planned in several centres across the country to highlight the plight of children who are being abused, and to kickstart a range of strategies that ordinary people can use in their whānau and communities to stop the abusers and help the victims.

The ‘Enough is Enough’ movement was sparked by a number of child abuse investigations and convictions in and around Kaitāia, the most horrific being the case of James Parker who abused dozens of young boys over more than a decade. Building on the energy and interest this distressing case generated, local organisers Lissa Kingi-Waiaua and Rueben Taipari, put out the call to mobilise.  As a result, there will be synchronised Hikoi in Kaitāia, Whangarei, Auckland and Hastings on Tuesday 13th March. The date was chosen to coincide with James Parker’s appearance in Kaitāia Court for sentencing.

Nationwide Facebook Event Pages:

AbuseHikoiFlyer MASTER

The Kaitāia leg of the Hikoi has been arranged to accommodate the sensitivities of the victims and their whānau, as well as the physical safety and interest of those taking part.  Local Kohanga Reo, Poipoi and other education centres have indicated they will attend with their tamariki.  So too has a a large contingent of kuia kaumātua.  Organisers urge everyone to join and show that Kaitāia does care and is willing to pull together to protect our children.

Kicking off at 10am from the Mana Party’s Te Hiku Branch office on North Rd, the Kaitāia Hikoi will make its way along Commerce St, before turning into Redan Rd and moving on to the reserve behind the old Far North District Council offices where the rest of the day’s programme will be held. Rueben and Lissa are grateful for the liaison and support they’ve enjoyed with Police, Court staff, local businesses and volunteers.  They are also deeply grateful for donations of bouncy castles to give the children an outlet for their energies, as well as for donations of drinks, tents, seating, a PA system and an MC to facilitate any speakers. They also hope the Hikoi will be a catalyst for ongoing public forums, practical workshops and other initiatives in Kaitāia and the rest of the country aimed at stopping child abuse and transforming communities into safe places for their most vulnerable members.

KAITAIA HIKOI ROUTE AND INFO:

  • Meeting point: 9.30am outside Te Hiku Mana Office, 60 North Rd.
  • Korero: Kaupapa, Safety guidelines, Marshall’s, Police, Karakia.
  • Hikoi commences: 10am
  • Yellow box: Kuia and kaumatua hook on (Old Pak N Save carpark/Farmers) 
  • Final destination: Reserve area behind old FNDC building, directly across from Kaitaia District Court. Reserve approved by FNDC.
  • Kaupapa finishes: 2pm

Local health organisations and whanau service providers have been invited to bring along their shade tents and/or stalls so information is readily available to whanau who maybe seeking help. If you would like to bring along an information stall/tent, please contact Lissa via fb.

There is an open invitation to all kohanga reo, play centres and kura’s to bring along some activities for the tamariki, coloring in, games, guitars, waiata etc. We’ve also provided some bouncy castles and music from Te Hiku Media – TAI FM. All tamariki and mokopuna MUST be supervised by an Adult / Care giver AT ALL TIMES.

This is a demonstration organised by whanau, for whanau. It’s about protecting our futures. Mauri ora kia tatou, na Lissa Kingi-Waiaua raua ko Rueben Taipari.

 

Far North Services Added to Community Resources Directory

Mental-health recovery resources from the Far North were added to most sections of the Community Resources Directory on the Engage Aotearoa website on the 1st of March.

The directory is now nearly 70-pages long and the Far North sub-sections include services from Whangarei, Kerikeri, Kaikohe, Dargaville, Kawakawa and Kaitaia that can be used to promote recovery, including creative connections, psychologists and counsellors, support services and more. 

If you spot something missing or have information to fill in the many gaps, please contact info@engagenz.co.nz.  

Nationwide Disability Services Consumer Forums 2013 Schedule 18 Feb – 25 March

2013 consumer forums

The Ministry of Health would like to hear your comments and ideas about the disability services they purchase.

More information please see here http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/disability-services/disability-projects-and-programmes/consumer-forums-hui-fono/2013-consumer-forums

The Ministry of Health is committed to enabling people with disabilities to lead a good life. Disability Support Services staff will be travelling to towns around NZ to let you know what the Ministry plans to do over the next few years. Your questions, comments and ideas will help them to get it right.

Who attends?

If you are a person with a disability, a family member or friend of a person with a disability we would welcome your attendance at these forums. You do not need to be a current user of Ministry-funded disability support services.

Where will the forums be held?

Four forums, one hui and one fono are being held in both the North and South Islands. The schedule below shows when they are coming to your area. Hui and fono will focus on improving disability services to Maori and Pasifika peoples.

How to register

It is important that you register if you would like to come along, for catering. You can register using the 0800 phone number OR the text number OR register online OR the email address below:

Sign Language Interpreters will be available at each meeting, other language interpreters will be arranged on request.

What topics will be covered?

  • the new model for supporting people with a disability
  • respite
  • individualised funding
  • choices in community living
  • supported living options
  • carer support
  • child and youth projects
  • behaviour support

It is hoped the forums, hui and fono will provide you with useful information and give you an opportunity to share ideas and give feedback.

Schedule of Disability Services Consumer Forums 2013

Locations, Dates, Meeting Times and Venues

  • Whangarei Forum: Monday 18 February 9:30am – 1:00pm Kingsgate Hotel Whangarei 9 Riverside Drive Whangarei
  • Auckland Fono: Tuesday 19 February 9:30am – 2:00pm Waipuna Hotel 58 Waipuna Rd Mt. Wellington, Auckland
  • Auckland Forum: Wednesday 20 February 9:30am – 1:00pm Waipuna Hotel 58 Waipuna Rd Mt. Wellington, Auckland
  • Hamilton Forum: Thursday 21 February 9:30am – 1:00pm Kingsgate Hotel Hamilton 100 Garnet Ave Te Rapa Hamilton
  • Hamilton Hui: Friday 22 February 9:30am – 2:00pm Kirikiriroa Marae 180 Dey Street, Hamilton East
  • Napier Forum: Monday 25 February 9:30am – 1:00pm Napier Memorial Conference Centre 48 Marine Parade Napier
  • Christchurch Forum: Monday 18 March 9:30am – 1:00pm Sudima Hotel Christchurch Airport 550 Memorial Avenue Christchurch
  • Christchurch Hui: Tuesday 19 March 9:30am – 2:00pm Rehua Marae 79 Springfield Road Christchurch
  • Christchurch Fono: Wednesday 20 March 9.30am – 2.00pm Sudima Hotel Christchurch Airport 550 Memorial Avenue Christchurch
  • Dunedin Forum: Thursday 21 March 9:30am – 1:00pm Royal NZ Foundation of the Blind Cnr Hillside and Law Streets, South Dunedin
  • Invercargill Forum: Friday 22 March 9:30am – 1:00pm Pacific Island Advisory and Cultural Trust 135 Bowmont Street Invercargill
  • Wellington Forum: Monday 25 March 9:30am – 1:00pm Brentwood Hotel 9 Kemp Street Kilbirnie Wellington