Engage Aotearoa

Tag Archives: New Zealand

National Poetry Day Competitions Calendar Launched

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The countdown to National Poetry Day (28 August) has begun.

There are a bunch of nationwide and regional poetry competitions open for entries now (or in the near future) on the National Poetry Day website.

Entry is free but submission criteria and dates vary.

If you write poetry, visit the 2015 Competitions Calendar to find out more.

The full National Poetry Day calendar of events is due to go live on the 3rd of August with events scheduled to take place across New Zealand on and around the 28th of August 2015.

Health Promotion Agency Launches “Don’t Know? Don’t Drink” Campaign

The Health Promotion Agency launched a new campaign called “Don’t Know? Don’t Drink” on the 14th June. The Campaign, which will run until September, aims to raise awareness about the effects of alcohol during early pregnancy and ultimately reduce rates of Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) in New Zealand.

“Don’t Know? Don’t Drink” encourages women to stop drinking alcohol if there is any chance they could be pregnant because alcohol can affect a developing baby throughout pregnancy, including before a woman knows she is pregnant. There is no known safe amount and no known safe time to drink alcohol during pregnancy.

Watch the first “Don’t Know? Don’t Drink” video here

Learn more about the signs and symptoms of FASD here

It’s Elder Abuse Awareness Week – New Zealand wide 15th – 22 June 2015

2015 commemorates 10 years of World Elder Abuse Awareness Day marked around the world on the 15th June. In New Zealand, this marks the start of an entire week dedicated to this important issue.

Age Concern will be holding events throughout New Zealand and speaking through the media to raise awareness of elder abuse and neglect during Elder Abuse Awareness Week.

When: 15th – 22nd June 2015
Where: Nationwide throughout Aotearoa, New Zealand
Find out more about Elder Abuse Awareness Week NZ 2015 on Age Concern’s website

Questionnaire: Performance of Nonprofit Healthcare Organisations

Ishani Soysa, a doctoral student (PhD) from Massey University, aims to develop and test a performance measurement framework that can be easily adopted by nonprofit healthcare organisations, given their missions, strategic goals and objectives. The questionnaire is a major component of the PhD as it collects data to test performance measurement frameworks empirically.

Ishani is collecting data from directors and senior executives in Australia and New Zealand, who are responsible for the governance of nonprofit healthcare organisations. If this is you, please complete the questionnaire.

Please visit the following link to respond to the questionnaire. Please do so within the next two weeks.

Or contact Ishani Soysa
Doctoral Researcher, School Of Engineering & Advanced Technology, Massey University

 

The Outsider Art Fair | Auckland 21-23 Nov 2014

The Outsider Art Fair makes its NZ debut at the Britomart Precinct from 21-23 November 2014.

The main venue will be the Nathan Club on Galway Lane and there will be pop up exhibitions in the stores around the Britomart Precinct, Live Art and Performance.

Check out the programme here

Like The Outsider Art Fair on Facebook 

Teacher Uses Coping Kete to Theme Static Image Lessons

Engage Aotearoa went to the Far North LifeHack Weekend in mid-2014 and met Ilana Hill, a Year 9 teacher at Taipa Area School with a passion for suicide prevention. She had the idea to use the content in The Coping Kete to get her students talking about coping and at the same time engage them meaningfully in the Static Image component of the Year 9 English curriculum.

Ilana says “I have a year 9 class that is full of energy and disparate personalities. I was very worried about engagement in English and I was seeking ways to make learning relevant and meaningful.” She adds, “I was really excited about helping make useful information about how to cope with depression visually accessible. I got the idea that perhaps … it could even be a subtle vehicle to teach them some of their own coping techniques for when times get tough.”

I hoped students would develop compassion and tools to become resilient as they progress through their teenage years in a very low decile area where they have to face a lot of negativity in their lives.”

Students were motivated by the knowledge that the top two posters would actually be shared on the Engage Aotearoa website to help more people find what they need. In this way, the project gave students an opportunity to make a real difference to their communities. Mindful of the sensitivity of mental-health related topics in school, Ilana worked with Engage Aotearoa and her school principal to set safe guidelines for the project and incorporated these into her existing lesson plans for the Year 9 static image curriculum.

Engage Aotearoa and the CMHRT board of trustees would like to thank Ilana for leading this partnership and giving permission for her material to be turned into a resource for others (this will be available on the Engage Aotearoa website shortly). The team also sends out a massive thanks to the students at Taipa Area School for their amazing work in creating graphic designs that share ideas that matter. You all did a fantastic job and in the words of the service director “we wish we had space for all of them!”

Check out the top two designs below and help us share these young Kiwis’ work as far and wide as it can go.

First Place

Aaliyah for It’s Ok to Have a Bad Day

Judges notes: “This poster design stood out for its simplicity and the importance of the message that Aaliyah chose to highlight from The Coping Kete. One of the most important things for surviving the tough times, is being allowed to have tough times. So much of our suffering comes from not being allowed to feel what we feel. Strategy 29 in The Coping Kete is all about telling ourselves that it is okay/acceptable to feel the whole spectrum of emotions, instead of trying to stay in the ‘positive’ ones all the time and judging ourselves for the ‘negative’ ones like anger, anxiety, sadness, jealousy or disgust.”
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 Second Place

Destiny for It Helps to Talk

Judges Notes: “Destiny chose to highlight a message that is central to most effective suicide prevention and mental-health promotion strategies. We liked the idea that a young person chose to share this particular message with other young people. In the words of a young person we met at KiwiFoo Camp in May, “kids are sick of adults telling them what to do”. Here we have a 14 year-old sharing the message that talking helps. We liked how the cup shape suggests sitting down to a cup of tea with someone and the words Destiny chose to fill the cup with might give people a few ideas of who to reach out to. It also says something about the range of people we need to get involved in creating truly supportive communities.”

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Emotional side-effects of antidepressants reported by more than 50% of largest sample surveyed to date

MEDIA RELEASE – UNIVERSITY OF LIVERPOOL – 18.02.2014

A survey of 1829 New Zealanders prescribed antidepressants, the largest sample ever surveyed, has found high rates of emotional and interpersonal adverse effects. The abstract of the paper, just published online in Psychiatry Research, follows:

Background: In the context of rapidly increasing antidepressant use internationally, and recent reviews raising concerns about efficacy and adverse effects, this study aimed to survey the lived experience of the largest sample of AD recipients to date.

Methods: An online questionnaire about experiences with, and beliefs about, antidepressants was completed by 1829 adults who had been prescribed antidepressants in the last five years.

Results: Eight of the 20 adverse effects studied were reported by over half the participants; most frequently Sexual Difficulties (62%) and Feeling Emotionally Numb (60%). Percentages for other effects included: Feeling Not Like Myself – 52%, Reduction In Positive Feelings – 42%, Caring Less About Others – 39%, Suicidality – 39% and Withdrawal Effects – 55%. Total Adverse Effect scores were related to younger age, lower education and income, and type of antidepressant, but not to level of depression prior to taking antidepressants.

Conclusions: The adverse effects of antidepressants may be more frequent than previously reported, and include emotional and interpersonal effects. Lead researcher, Professor John Read (Institute of Psychology, Health and Society; University of Liverpool) comments: “The medicalization of sadness and distress has reached bizarre levels. One in ten people in some countries are now prescribed antidepressants each year.”

“While the biological side effects of antidepressants, such as weight gain and nausea, are well documented, the psychological and interpersonal effects have been largely ignored or denied. They appear to be alarmingly common.”

“Effects such as feeling emotionally numb and caring less about other people are of major concern. Our study also found that people are not being told about these effects when prescribed the drugs.”

“Our finding that over a third of respondents reported suicidality ‘as a result of taking the antidepressants’ suggests that earlier studies may have underestimated the problem.”

Over half (55%) of young people (18-25years) reported suicidality.

“Our sample was not biased towards people with an axe to grind about anti-depressants; 82% reported that the drugs had helped alleviate their depression.”

readj@liv.ac.uk

Read, J., Cartwright, C., Gibson, K. (2014). Adverse emotional and interpersonal effects reported by 1,829 New Zealanders while taking antidepressants.  Psychiatry Research

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2014.01.042

Universal Periodic Review: Do New Zealanders Have Their Human Rights Upheld?

The right to health, to justice, to work, to education, to be free from discrimination: these rights belong to all of us. New Zealand has signed international agreements to uphold these rights, but how well are we actually doing?

The Universal Periodic Review is an important opportunity for individuals, NGOs and civil society organisations to share their experience and views on New Zealand’s realisation of human rights for everyone. What people and communities say can influence future developments. It isn’t just about writing reports. Communities will be consulted on what’s important for them. UPR 13/14 is an opportunity to work with other like minded groups, and to lobby the Government to make voluntary commitments and/or accept recommendations made by the working group following the UPR 13/14 process.

The Commission is offering free workshops to support civil society in UPR 13/14. In addition there will be opportunities to engage in discussions with government officials in April/May and subsequently to comment on the draft New Zealand government report. The Commission would also welcome the opportunity to discuss key issues with community groups and individuals to feed into the UPR 13/14 process.

The workshop dates and times for 2013 are:

  • Auckland          26 March (1.30 – 4.30pm) Auckland Law School
  • Wellington        4 April (1.30-4.30)
  • Christchurch      11 April (1.30-4.30)
  • Dunedin           16 April (1.30-4.30)
  • Hamilton          7 May (1.30-4.30)
  • Invercargill      9 May (Time TBC)

Please contact Michael White on michaelw@hrc.co.nz if:

  • You wish to attend one of the Commission’s workshops;
  • Would like to receive further emails about how to be involved in the UPR process;
  • If you or your organization are hosting an event where the Commission could talk about UPR 13/14; or
  • You would like the Commission to assist with facilitating co-ordinated engagement from your sector.

In the meantime for more information on UPR 13/14 and how you can get involved see: http://www.hrc.co.nz/international-human-rights-new/faqs-for-upr-1314

The Commission looks forward to working with you around UPR 13/14 to ensure the full and active engagement of civil society organisations across the country, helping to garner actual positive changes on the ground.