Engage Aotearoa

Category Archives: Human Rights And Legal Issues

Information and updates on human rights and legislation issues related to mental health.

British Psychological Society releases position statement on psychologists with lived experience

The British Psychological Society’s Division of Clinical Psychology released a position statement on clinical psychologists with lived experience of mental health difficulties on the 19th of August.

The document opens by stating, “The Division of Clinical Psychology publicly recognises and supports the unique and valued contribution that lived experience of mental health difficulties brings to individuals working within clinical psychology.”

It goes on to recognise how many therapists with lived experience there are among the profession, the diversity of these experiences, the complexity involved in making decisions to disclose these experiences, the impact of stigma, and the value these experiences bring to the work and the field as a whole.

They close by writing, “Overall, this statement wishes to make clear that lived experience of mental health difficulties does not have to be a barrier to training or practising as a clinical psychologist. On the contrary, people with lived experience are an asset to the profession and make a significant contribution to it”.

As a therapist with lived experience myself, it is a wonderful thing to see these points written down by such a well respected group. I look forward to the day that the professional bodies here in New Zealand take similar steps. I am incredibly grateful to the good folks at In2Gr8 Mental Health for the hand they had in making this a reality.

Read the full position statement here www.bps.org.uk/news-and-policy/statement-clinical-psychologists-lived-experience-mental-health-difficulties


Towards Restraint Free Mental Health Practice

In case you missed it, Te Pou have launched a new resource called Towards restraint free mental health practice: Supporting the reduction and prevention of personal restraint in mental health inpatient settings. This resource is the latest in a suite of work from Te Pou that is aimed at reducing and preventing the use of seclusion and restraint in New Zealand mental-health services. According to the Te Pou website “Every mental health inpatient unit in New Zealand is engaged in some form of practice based activity that promotes least restrictive practice.” This latest resource is intended to assist services to put ‘least restrictive practices’ in place and reduce the use of seclusion and restraint.

Find out more and download the resource here

 

Te Pou: Towards restraint-free mental health practice

Te Pou is pleased to launch Towards restraint free mental health practice: Supporting the reduction and prevention of personal restraint in mental health inpatient settings. This resource is the latest in a suite of work aimed at reducing and preventing the use of seclusion and restraint. Services can use this resource to plan and identify best practices that support a least restrictive approach to service delivery.

Contact:
Te Pou
Level 2, Building B, 8 Nugent Street, Grafton, Auckland 1023.
Telephone: +64 9 373 2125www.tepou.org.nz

New Ministry of Health guidelines for COPMIA

The Ministry of Health will soon release the national COPMIA guideline, currently in draft.

This guideline will outline the responsibilities all mental health and addiction services have to the children of parents with mental illness and or addiction (COPMIA) and their families and whānau. For some, this is going to mean a big shift in the way that services operate. The guideline envisions a mental health and addiction sector that is inclusive of family and whānau, focusses on strengths, and promotes and protects the wellbeing and rights of children. It promotes early intervention in the lives of children to support resilience, offering evidenced based and culturally appropriate ways of working, and across sector partnerships to meet the needs of children and their families and whānau.

For more information click on this link to Te Pou.

Or contact Mark Smith at Te Pou
Phone number: 07 857 1278
Mobile number: 027 687 7127

Synergia Report -Think Differently, Ministry of Social Development

Think Differently, led by the Ministry of Social Development, is a social change campaign that seeks to encourage and support a fundamental shift in attitudes and behaviours towards disabled people.

It works across community and national level activities to mobilise personal and community action, to change social attitudes and beliefs that lead to disabled people being excluded, and to increase people’s knowledge and understanding of disability and the benefits of inclusive communities. To support this work, Think Differently commissioned a review of the published and grey literature to understand the factors that cause disabled people to be socially excluded. The review is designed to inform the further development of the Think Differently Campaign. This summary focuses on understanding social exclusion and its key drivers. The methods and a more detailed analysis of the key concepts are provided in the main body of this report.

 

 

Te Pou: Peer support competencies ‘sandstone to sharpen practice on’

The following is a press release from Te Pou, from their website:

The resource Competencies for the mental health and addiction service user, consumer and peer workforce were launched on November 11 at Te Pou in Auckland.

Dr John Crawshaw, director of mental health, gave an opening address to the mental health and addiction sector people from across the North Island. He acknowledged the pivotal role the service user, consumer and peer workforce has in informing service development and working alongside clinical services, supporting people to self manage and drive their own recovery.

Dr Crawshaw was followed by two peer support workers who spoke about their experience and what peer work meant for them. Elton Hakopa, addiction peer support worker from the drug court, gave a stirring and entertaining outline of his experiences. Elton gave the quote of the day, or even the year when he said “these competencies are the sandstone I will sharpen my practice on”.

Ahmad Al-Ali, mental health peer worker from Mind and Body, also entertained the crowd with his self-deprecating wit and story of courage. Both exemplified the state of gratitude they were in to be able to use their powerful experiences to support other people’s self-determination and wellbeing.

Robyn Shearer, Te Pou chief executive, talked about the power of people from across mental health and addiction co-designing and co-developing the competencies.

Two documents created to support the competency framework were also launched: The Service user, consumer and peer workforce guide for managers and employers and the Service user, consumer and peer workforce guide for planners and funders. These are available to download alongside the competencies. These documents provide information and sound direction for people managing and employing peer workforce members and for planners and funders investing in this exciting growth area in the mental health and addiction workforce.

To contact Te Pou or for further information:

http://www.tepou.co.nz/

Email: info@tepou.co.nz

Te Pou phone numbers online here.

IIMHL New Zealand Special Update

The following links are a summary of the IIMHL AND IIDL UPDATE – 15 NOVEMBER 2014

If you want further information on the IIMHL organisation go here. To sign up for their mailing list go here.

For general enquiries about these links or for other IIMHL information please contact Erin Geaney at erin@iimhl.com.

  1. The Physical Health of People with a Serious Mental Illness and/or Addiction: An evidence review
  2. Stories of Success
  3. Tihei Mauri Ora: Supporting whānau through suicidal distress
  4. New ‘wellbeing bank’ for baby boomers
  5. “There is always someone worse off…” (regarding the earthquakes in Christchurch)
  6. Debriefing following seclusion and restraint: A summary of relevant literature
  7. Families and whānau status report 2014: Towards measuring the wellbeing of families and whānau
  8. Growing Up in New Zealand: Vulnerability Report 1: Exploring the Definition of Vulnerability for Children in their First 1000 Days (July 2014)
  9. Parents or caregivers of children with a disability have a voice in New Zealand (video playlist)

Also recommended in the update are:

Effective parenting programmes: A review of the effectiveness of parenting programmes for parents of vulnerable children
(2014, April 14). Wellington: Families Commission

New Zealand practice guidelines for opioid substitution treatment
(2014, April). Wellington: Ministry of Health

 

 

Compulsory Treatment in NZ Mental Health | Take it From Us radio 18 Nov 2014

Tomorrow Take It From Us again takes a look at the frequency of compulsory treatment orders issued within our mental health system, and reviews the most recent report on our mental health from the director of mental health in his annual report. Hear the thoughts of consumers James King and Reina Harris about these issues, and how discriminatory such legislation can be.

Take It From Us, PlanetFM104.6 @ 12.30pm Tuesday 17 November 2014 

Listen live on 104.6FM at 12.30pm or online www.planetaudio.org.nz

OR if you missed the broadcast, listen for the next seven days @: www.planetaudio.org.nz/takeitfromus

Email Sheldon.brown@framework.org.nz for any feedback and comment/suggestions for shows. 

Four Articles from the APA Monitor

The following content is from the Monitor digital newsletter. The Monitor is the magazine of the American Psychological Association, which they describe as “a must-read for psychology educators, scientists and practitioners.”

Born Bashful

Psychologists have new insights into the causes and effects of childhood shyness.

Unlocking the Emotions of Cancer

A new mandate requires cancer centers to screen oncology patients for distress.

Double Whammy Discrimination

Health-care providers’ biases and misunderstandings are keeping some older LGBT patients from getting the care they need. Psychologists are working to change that.

Suicide and Intimate Partner Violence

A US federal initiative aims to bring experts from the two fields closer together in an effort to save lives.

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SAMHSA: Trauma and “Trauma-Informed” Care

The following is a deatiled release on ‘Trauma and “Trauma-Informed” Care’ from  SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Association of the USA).

The recently released Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 57, Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services (Trauma TIP), offers behavioral health service providers and program administrators information and practices to assist people who have experienced repeated, chronic, or multiple traumas. People who experience trauma are more likely to exhibit pronounced symptoms and consequences, including substance misuse, mental illness, and other health problems. For this reason, addressing trauma is a public health priority under the SAMHSA Trauma and Justice Strategic Initiative.

Trauma results from an event or a series of events that subsequently causes intense physical and psychological stress reactions. The individual’s functioning and emotional, physical, social, and spiritual health can be affected. Some of the most common traumatic experiences include violence, abuse, neglect, disaster, terrorism, and war. People of all ages, ethnic backgrounds, sexual orientations, and economic conditions may experience trauma. Trauma can affect a person’s functional ability – including interacting with others, performing at work, and sleeping – and contribute to responses – including isolation, anxiety, substance misuse, and overeating or under eating – that can increase health risks. Behavioral health service providers can benefit greatly from understanding the nature and impact of trauma and the benefits of a trauma-informed approach.

Adopting trauma-informed policies may require a fundamental cultural shift within organizations intended to promote a greater sense of equality and safety. This may lead to changes in governance and leadership; organizational policy; engagement and involvement of people in recovery, trauma survivors, consumers, and family members; cross-sector collaboration; services and interventions; training and workforce development; protocols and procedures; quality assurance; budgeting and financing; evaluation; and the physical environment of the organization.