Engage Aotearoa

Category Archives: Politics

Te Pou: Towards restraint-free mental health practice

Te Pou is pleased to launch Towards restraint free mental health practice: Supporting the reduction and prevention of personal restraint in mental health inpatient settings. This resource is the latest in a suite of work aimed at reducing and preventing the use of seclusion and restraint. Services can use this resource to plan and identify best practices that support a least restrictive approach to service delivery.

Contact:
Te Pou
Level 2, Building B, 8 Nugent Street, Grafton, Auckland 1023.
Telephone: +64 9 373 2125www.tepou.org.nz

New Ministry of Health guidelines for COPMIA

The Ministry of Health will soon release the national COPMIA guideline, currently in draft.

This guideline will outline the responsibilities all mental health and addiction services have to the children of parents with mental illness and or addiction (COPMIA) and their families and whānau. For some, this is going to mean a big shift in the way that services operate. The guideline envisions a mental health and addiction sector that is inclusive of family and whānau, focusses on strengths, and promotes and protects the wellbeing and rights of children. It promotes early intervention in the lives of children to support resilience, offering evidenced based and culturally appropriate ways of working, and across sector partnerships to meet the needs of children and their families and whānau.

For more information click on this link to Te Pou.

Or contact Mark Smith at Te Pou
Phone number: 07 857 1278
Mobile number: 027 687 7127

DRIVE Update: Christmas Special Hui & Notices

DRIVE announces the final hui date for the year, featuring guest musician Sam RB and a chance for you to perform.

Date: Thursday 18 December
Time: 10.45 for an 11am start
Place: Pacific Business Trust, 733 Great South Road, Papatoetoe

RSVP’s are essential as lunch will be supplied. DRIVE may not be able to cater for all needs, but please get in touch if you have any dietary requirements.

The October Hui was a productive day of brainstorming what was important to consumers, and what they wanted from services. Drive hopes to give you further feedback about this soon. They also have a list of events that are happening in the next couple of weeks that may be of interest. These include several art events, training opportunities and some chances for you to use your experiences to give some feedback around parenting and mental illness, and the Auckland Council psychoactive substances policy.

Contact DRIVE via:

Email: sheree.veysey@connectsr.org.nz

Mailing address: DRIVE Network, PO Box 102 149, North Shore Mail Centre, Auckland, 0745, New Zealand

AUT and Changing Minds: Quality of Life Issues During Mental Health Recovery

AUT and Changing Minds are interested in hearing what people think and feel about Quality of Life and mental health recovery.

AUT and Changing Minds are seeking interested people with lived experience of mental health recovery to take part in a focus group and some exercises to help answer this question.

Answers will help them to identify the most important life issues for people living with and recovering from mental illness.

Feel free to pass on this invitation to others who could also be interested in participating. A voucher for your time and refreshments will be provided. Thank you!

For further information or if you would like to participate, please contact Margaret, so she can arrange a suitable time to meet. Email or text on:

margaret@changingminds.org.nz

Phone: 021 2177 377

http://changingminds.org.nz/

IIMHL New Zealand Special Update

The following links are a summary of the IIMHL AND IIDL UPDATE – 15 NOVEMBER 2014

If you want further information on the IIMHL organisation go here. To sign up for their mailing list go here.

For general enquiries about these links or for other IIMHL information please contact Erin Geaney at erin@iimhl.com.

  1. The Physical Health of People with a Serious Mental Illness and/or Addiction: An evidence review
  2. Stories of Success
  3. Tihei Mauri Ora: Supporting whānau through suicidal distress
  4. New ‘wellbeing bank’ for baby boomers
  5. “There is always someone worse off…” (regarding the earthquakes in Christchurch)
  6. Debriefing following seclusion and restraint: A summary of relevant literature
  7. Families and whānau status report 2014: Towards measuring the wellbeing of families and whānau
  8. Growing Up in New Zealand: Vulnerability Report 1: Exploring the Definition of Vulnerability for Children in their First 1000 Days (July 2014)
  9. Parents or caregivers of children with a disability have a voice in New Zealand (video playlist)

Also recommended in the update are:

Effective parenting programmes: A review of the effectiveness of parenting programmes for parents of vulnerable children
(2014, April 14). Wellington: Families Commission

New Zealand practice guidelines for opioid substitution treatment
(2014, April). Wellington: Ministry of Health

 

 

Fair Funding: unfair funding practices must change

Fair Funding aims to re-establish an equitable funding system and stop the decline of the NGO system of community care. This follows exhaustive attempts to resolve these issues over successive years but with no meaningful response from DHBs. They continue to ignore the situation.

New Zealand must see a return to fair funding practices for NGOs to be at their best and fully responsive to community needs. Every year many DHBs compromise this and as a result are placing great strain on a previously effective working partnership with the NGO sector.

Unless DHBs take immediate corrective action, New Zealand faces a future without sufficient community-based mental health and addiction care. This would see a return to days gone by when people couldn’t access services in a timely way, resulting in them and their families in distress, and crisis and emergency services overrun with people desperate for help.

Link here for more information and to add your support.

Fair Funding for the Future of Mental Health

In order for mental health to have a future, we need government and DHBs to change their funding practices. The Fair Funding campaign is calling on the Government and DHBs to do just that.

For more information and to show your support for us, please visit: www.fairfunding.org.nz

Please support us by:

  • Sending an email to MPs and the Chairs and CEOs of the 20 DHBs (an automated email system is set up here: http://www.fairfunding.org.nz/support/thanks)
  • Sharing the campaign details on Facebook
  • Telling as many people as you can about the issue and asking them to show their support by visiting the website, sharing the information and emailing MPs and DHBs about the issue.

There will also be a political debate on the topic at 7pm on Monday the 28th of July at One Tree Hill College in Auckland. Further details to come.

Many thanks for your time and support on this crucial issue,

Laura

Laura Ashton (MSocP (1st class hons), PGDip, BA)
Business Services Manager
Mind and Body Consultants
Ph: (64 9) 630 5909 ext 801
Mob: (027) 212 9225
Fax: (64 9) 630 5944
www.mindandbody.co.nz

The Press: Mental Health Wards Clogged with the Homeless

Olivia Carville of The Press writes on Stuff.co.nz:

“The CDHB is trying to deal with the “urgent dilemma” created by the city’s social housing shortage. At a CDHB meeting yesterday, specialist mental health services manager Toni Gutschlag said the housing shortage was causing “significant problems”. On any given night, up to 25 patients were staying in Hillmorton Hospital – when they did not need to be there – because of a lack of affordable housing options.”

Read the rest of the article here.

Engage Aotearoa is aware that acute wards of hospitals in every city are often used by those with no better place to go. We feel it highlights the need for better and more viable accommodation options for those coming out of acute care.

New Like Minds, Like Mine National Plan 2014-2019

The Ministry of Health has just released the new Like Minds, Like Mine National Plan 2014-2019.

The plan sets the guiding principles for service delivery of the Like Minds, Like Mine programme for the next five years. It provides direction for the continuation of the journey towards greater social inclusion for people with mental illness in New Zealand. Download it here: (PDF)

It begins: “This Like Minds, Like Mine National Plan 2014–2019 will take the programme into and past its 20th year. It is timely then to look back on its considerable success in reducing stigma and discrimination and to consider how the programme needs to evolve in order to build on that success in the future.”

New Pathway for ACC Sensitive Claims

ACC are the government organisation that can help people with a physical and/or mental injury suffered as a result of sexual abuse or sexual assault.

A new pathway for ACC Sensitive Claims was released in March this year. 

This page provides an overview of the new ACC sensitive claims service, including its key features.

You’ll need to talk to a GP or a counselor to lodge a sensitive claim with ACC.

For more information about how to lodge a sensitive claim, click here.