Engage Aotearoa

Category Archives: Online Resources

Information and news about mental-health resources that can be found online.

New programmes added to The Wellbeing Sessions

Whakatau Mai: The Wellbeing Sessions are a series of free online groups funded by the Ministry of Health as part of the national Covid19 response. They were started during the first Lockdown by the good folks over at Changing Minds who have curated a weekly calendar of zoom sessions that anyone with an internet connection and a device can join.

You’ll find regular sessions covering things like mindfulness, journaling, yoga, and managing work uncertainty, The Mind Tribe’s safe tapering group, and the recently added Realities Group, which I am really excited to see up and running.

The Realities Group
An opportunity for people who experience other realities to discuss their experiences and gain support, with the aim of better understanding these experiences and how to live well with them.  Based on the principles of the Hearing Voices Movement.
https://wellbeingsessions.eventcalendarapp.com/u/22079/91766

The Wellbeing Sessions will run through to February 2021.

Clinicians share their lived experience: In Conversation episodes 1-5

The In Conversation Series from In2GreatMentalHealth invites mental health professionals to share their lived experience to help reduce the stigma associated with mental-health difficulties in our communities and within the mental-health workforce.

Scroll down for episodes 1-5.
I’ve gathered together episodes 6-11 for you here.
Watch the full series on In2Gr8’s Youtube channel here.

Episode One: Clinical psychologists Dr Natalie Kemp and Dr Anna Sicilia introduce the series and talk about their lived experience and stigma in the mental heath scene.

Episode Two: Professor Patrick Corrigan in conversation with Dr Natalie Kemp about his lived experience and how things have shifted over the years.

Episode Three: Clinical psychologist Dr Nneamaka Ekebuisi talks about their lived experience of mental health difficulties and intersectional issues.

Episode Four: Mental health nurse Kate Snewin speaks about her lived experience of mental health difficulties and the impact of work culture on navigating this.

Episode Five: Dr Thomas Richardson talking to Dr Natalie Kemp about his experience of navigating lived experience of bipolar disorder as a clinical psychologist.


Clinicians share their lived experience: In Conversation episodes 6 – 11

In Conversation is a series of interviews with mental-health clinicians who have their own lived experience of struggling with their mental health from In2Gr8 Mental Health in the UK. The first five episodes feature Dr Natalie Kemp in conversation with Dr Anna Sicilia, Professor Patick Corrigan (clin psych), Dr Nneamaka Ekebuisi (clin psych), Kate Snewin (RMN), and Dr Thomas Richardson (clin psych).

Scroll down for episodes 6-11.

Episode Six: Dr Stephen Linacre, clinical psychologist, talks about his lived experience of significant eating difficulties and the professional work he does now in this area.

Episode Seven: Dr Inke Schreiber, clinical psychologist talks with Natalie Kemp about her lived experience of mental health difficulties.


Episode eight: Dr Rufus May, clinical psychologist talks about his lived experience of mental health difficulties and working in the mental-health sector.

Episode Nine: Michelle Jamieson, PhD candidate, speaks about her lived experience of mental health difficulties and issues of intersectionality.

Episode Ten: Professor Jamie Hacker-Hughes talks about his lived experience of the diagnosis of bipolar disorder, and working for many years professionally in the mental health scene.

Episode Eleven: Emily-May Barlow, Mental Health Nurse and academic, talks about her lived experience of mental health difficulties, in particular, of dissociation.

British Psychological Society releases position statement on psychologists with lived experience

The British Psychological Society’s Division of Clinical Psychology released a position statement on clinical psychologists with lived experience of mental health difficulties on the 19th of August.

The document opens by stating, “The Division of Clinical Psychology publicly recognises and supports the unique and valued contribution that lived experience of mental health difficulties brings to individuals working within clinical psychology.”

It goes on to recognise how many therapists with lived experience there are among the profession, the diversity of these experiences, the complexity involved in making decisions to disclose these experiences, the impact of stigma, and the value these experiences bring to the work and the field as a whole.

They close by writing, “Overall, this statement wishes to make clear that lived experience of mental health difficulties does not have to be a barrier to training or practising as a clinical psychologist. On the contrary, people with lived experience are an asset to the profession and make a significant contribution to it”.

As a therapist with lived experience myself, it is a wonderful thing to see these points written down by such a well respected group. I look forward to the day that the professional bodies here in New Zealand take similar steps. I am incredibly grateful to the good folks at In2Gr8 Mental Health for the hand they had in making this a reality.

Read the full position statement here www.bps.org.uk/news-and-policy/statement-clinical-psychologists-lived-experience-mental-health-difficulties


Trauma informed mindfulness

With all that is going on the world at the moment, there is a lot of talk about the benefits of mindfulness as a way to cope and heaps of useful tips being shared online. But learning mindfulness can be tricky, especially when we have trauma or psychosis on board, and some adaptations are often needed. So I thought I’d dig up a bit of information to share and came across this article on Psychology Today which sums it up nicely.

“While there is strong scientific evidence to support the use of mindfulness for emotional and psychological healing, it is also important to recognize how these practices can lead to increased distress. For those with unresolved trauma, the practice of mindfulness can be approached carefully and thoughtfully to minimize the likelihood of negative outcomes. […] For some, intentionally engaging in the experience of “being present” with thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations can lead to a resurfacing of unresolved, or even undiscovered, issues and feelings. […] At times, being mindful can leave a survivor feeling like they are trapped or helpless again.” Read more about trauma-informed mindfulness here: http://www.psychologytoday.com/nz/blog/choosing-your-meditation-style/202006/trauma-informed-mindfulness

If you find doing exercises like the Mindful SNACK difficult, this article might help explain why. Know that it’s normal if you’ve got distressing experiences going on inside. Go gently with yourself. Many people find it helpful to start practising for very short times, with things that are outside of them like the view, an object or a piece of music, or while doing something, like walking, eating, drinking a cuppa, or stretching.


An illustrated guide to the positive childhood experiences that build resilience

Many people are familiar with the research showing that Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are strongly predictive of later experiences of mental-health challenges and a whole host of other poor outcomes. But what about the experiences that strengthen our resilience?

A 2019 study looked at the childhood experiences involved in building resilience and experiences of wellbeing. They identified seven childhood experiences shared by resilient adults. Artist and therapist Lindsay Braman has illustrated the key findings so they’re super easy to read and share.

Of course if you missed out on these experiences in childhood, there’s still plenty you can do to build your resilience later. Humans are just so resourceful and creative, it’s amazing how many ways we can find strength.

Read more about the 7 Positive Childhood Experience associated with resilient adults here.

Highlights from Engage on Facebook

We Can’t Keep Treating Anxiety From Complex Trauma the Same Way We Treat Generalized Anxiety: Vicki Peterson writes “I’ve been living with the effects of complex trauma for a long time, but for many years, I didn’t know what it was. […] For those who have experienced trauma, anxiety comes from an automatic physiological response to what has actuallyalready happened. The brain and body have already lived through “worst case scenario” situations, know what it feels like and are hell-bent on never going back there again. The fight/flight/ freeze response goes into overdrive. It’s like living with a fire alarm that goes off at random intervals 24 hours a day. It is extremely difficult for the rational brain to be convinced “that won’t happen,” because it already knows that it has happened, and it was horrific.” Read more here.

Man Lessons – How to make a documentary about transitioning: “Over six years, Ben Sarten filmed Adam Rohe (who was assigned female at birth) on his journey into manhood, forming a friendship that to them has become as important as the documentary itself.” Read more here.

I was diagnosed with acute psychosis at 19. Here’s what came next:Kris Herbert reflects on her tumultuous mental health journey to share what she’s learnt along the way. She writes,”Our mental wellbeing is not fixed. It’s a shifting continuum and at the edges, we each have our limits. We all also have access to tools like exercise and meditation, good food and, hopefully, someone to talk to.” Read more here.

Researchers Find Lack of Evidence, Call for Halt to ECT: “A new review, published in Ethical Human Psychology and Psychiatry, re-assesses studies that compare electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with placebo treatment for depression. The analysis also assesses the only five available meta-analyses that claim that ECT is effective.” In a press release, John Read, the lead author says “This body of research is of the lowest quality of any I have seen in my 40-year career.” Read more here. In related news, dozens of people have sued the NHS after experiencing a slew of serious adverse effects that they were not informed of before they consented to ECT procedures.

Inside Internal Family Systems Therapy: In this article, Ben Blum gives a detailed description of Internal Family Systems Therapy (IFS), including both clinician and service-user perspectives. Blum writes,”IFS therapy is upending the thinking around schizophrenia, depression, OCD, and more. […] In IFS, mental health symptoms like anxiety, depression, paranoia, and even psychosis were regarded not as impassive biochemical phenomena but as emotional events under the control of unconscious “parts” of the patient — which they could learn to interact with directly.” Read more here.

Find more on the Engage Facebook page.
www.facebook.com/engageaotearoa/

Alcohol and drug withdrawal tips from the NZ Drug Foundation

Many Kiwis were affected by alcohol and drug withdrawal symptoms during the Covid19 lockdown and the NZ Drug Foundation compiled some vital strategies and tips for people struggling with their alcohol or drug use. Visit www.drugfoundation.org.nz/covid-19/

Online Wellbeing Sessions from Changing Minds

During lock-down Auckland’s service-user network, Changing Minds, started sharing free peer-led support sessions online and this project has grown wings to make it easier for people to connect and take care of themselves during this extra stressful time.

Visit www.wellbeingsessions.nz to select from a menu of options from mindful journaling, fitness sessions, poetry readings, a drop-in support group, a supporting families group and more.

New issue of the Journal of Contemporary Narrative Therapy out now

The latest issue of the Journal of Contemporary Narrative Therapy is online now, free for anyone to read and full of great reflections like this quote from Rebecca Solnit…

“What’s your story about? It’s all in the telling. Stories are compasses and architecture; we navigate by them, we build our sanctuaries and our prisons out of them, and to be without a story is to be lost in the vastness of a world that spreads in all directions like arctic tundra or sea ice…We tell ourselves stories that save us and stories that are the quicksand in which we thrash and the well in which we drown… We think we tell stories, but stories often tell us … The task of learning to be free requires learning to hear them, to question them, to pause and hear silence, to name them and then to become the storyteller.”

Find the latest issue and an archive of past issues here.

Editors: Tom Stone Carlson, Sanni Paljakka, marcela polanco, and David Epston