Engage Aotearoa

Seen the New Mental Health Foundation Webstore yet?

The Mental Health Foundation of NZ has launched a new webstore and it’s open and ready for orders!

With a fresh new look and loads of easy to find items, the webstore is “brimming with, books, pamphlets, CDs, reports and handy new features.”

They have all their usual stock in-store and some new items as well, like two new Mental Health Foundation research reports focusing on discrimination and social inclusion: Young people’s experience of discrimination in relation to mental health issues in Aotearoa New Zealand and What works: Positive experiences in open employment of mental health service users.

Service User Leader Acknowledged in Queen’s Birthday Honours

Mary O’Hagan was made a Member of The New Zealand Order of Merit in the Queen’s Honours List on the 1st of June, for her “services to mental health”.

Mary has a long history of working to advocate for service-user perspectives in the delivery of mental-health services, former Mental health Commissioner, she was heavily involved in the Like Minds Like Mine programme, set-up Peer Zone and has written many articles and a book about her experiences, Madness Made Me.

This award is a much-deserved acknowledgement of Mary’s years of contribution and an acknowledgment of the value of the type of work Mary has been so tirelessly championing. Congratulations, Mary, and thank you!

Mental Health Professionals Invited to Join Global Clinical Practice Network

The World Health Organisation is inviting mental-health and primary care professionals to join the Global Clinical Practice Network (GCPN).

This is a network of more than 11,000 mental health researchers, clinicians and practitioners in 139 countries.

For more information and contact details visit: www.globalclinicalpractice.net

 

Free Access to Journal Articles on Diversity and Cultural Psychiatry

Routledge Journals is offering free access to a collection of over 55 articles on the topic of Diversity & Cultural Psychiatry. You can now view and download each of these articles for free, but the offer is only open for a limited time.

For more information visit the Free Article Collection at Taylor and Francis Online here.

Expires July 31, 2015.

Engage Consideration: “Crazy”

Hello from Engage.

I often notice, not only in the media but around family, friends and strangers, the pejorative use of the terms of mental illness – people use ‘crazy’ to mean ‘bad’ all the time. “You drove drunk? You must be insane!” “She stole all the money even though she knew she’d be caught – crazy!” “The only reason you would kill a person is if you were mad.”

Bad things are often crazy. Crazy things are rarely bad. I have read some fine pieces encouraging the use of phrases such as “crazy good” and “mad fun”, and I love these phrases and want to hear them more. The comparison I want to make briefly here though is to the use of the word ‘gay’ to mean ‘bad’, which is appropriately frowned upon. People seem to understand now that using the denomination of a group of people as a catchword for the negative is just not on. So I hope it may go for ‘crazy’ some day.

If somebody uses crazy to mean bad, call them out on it. Say to them, “Being bad may be crazy, but being crazy isn’t bad.”

Daniel Larsen-Barr

Engage Facebook Updates

Here are a half a dozen recent highlights from our Facebook page. Please LIKE US!

Mr David Rutherford, Chief Human Rights Commissioner, releases the updated 2015 Bullying Prevention Guidelines on Pink Shirt Day at Silverstream School.
They call it waking up alive – that moment you’re aware your suicide attempt was not fatal.
Devastating news for vulnerable Kiwis
Relationships Aotearoa struggling to stay afloat.
New Zealand’s social welfare system “dehumanises” people in need.
Laughter yoga is the practice of deliberate, voluntary laughter. The idea is that forced laughter soon turns into real laughter.

Te Pou: Towards restraint-free mental health practice

Te Pou is pleased to launch Towards restraint free mental health practice: Supporting the reduction and prevention of personal restraint in mental health inpatient settings. This resource is the latest in a suite of work aimed at reducing and preventing the use of seclusion and restraint. Services can use this resource to plan and identify best practices that support a least restrictive approach to service delivery.

Contact:
Te Pou
Level 2, Building B, 8 Nugent Street, Grafton, Auckland 1023.
Telephone: +64 9 373 2125www.tepou.org.nz

Reprints of popular Mental Health Commision resources now available

Due to popular demand, new versions of “Oranga Ngākau – Getting the most out of Mental Health and Addiction Services: A recovery resource for service users” and “When someone you care about has a mental health or addiction issue” are available in hard copy or by download.

“Oranga Ngākau” is easy to understand and provides valuable information about what to expect from treatment in mental health and addiction services. This includes a glossary of terms used during care, as well as describing different possible scenarios when using these services for the first time.

“When someone you care about has a mental health or addiction issue” is a resource for those who are supporting others. Read about the best ways for family, whānau and friends to help people close to them who are in care, as well as how to find support for themselves, should they need it.

Contact:
Kim Higginson, Information Officer, Mental Health Foundation
info@mentalhealth.org.nz

New Ministry of Health guidelines for COPMIA

The Ministry of Health will soon release the national COPMIA guideline, currently in draft.

This guideline will outline the responsibilities all mental health and addiction services have to the children of parents with mental illness and or addiction (COPMIA) and their families and whānau. For some, this is going to mean a big shift in the way that services operate. The guideline envisions a mental health and addiction sector that is inclusive of family and whānau, focusses on strengths, and promotes and protects the wellbeing and rights of children. It promotes early intervention in the lives of children to support resilience, offering evidenced based and culturally appropriate ways of working, and across sector partnerships to meet the needs of children and their families and whānau.

For more information click on this link to Te Pou.

Or contact Mark Smith at Te Pou
Phone number: 07 857 1278
Mobile number: 027 687 7127

Mental Health Foundation: A to Z of Mental Health

Have you seen the Mental Health Foundation of New Zealand’s new A‒Z of mental health conditions? From anxiety to suicidal feelings, they have compiled the best-quality information about mental health conditions available in New Zealand so you have all the information you need to make informed decisions about your mental health.

No one should have to go through a mental health problem alone. They believe the information in the A‒Z will help remove some of the fear and confusion that can accompany a diagnosis of mental illness, allowing individuals, families and whānau some peace of mind so they can move forward together.

Each page contains information about symptoms, causes and treatment options, and addresses some of the common myths associated with that condition. You will also find links to support groups, brochures with further information, useful links, and tips for looking after yourself. It really is a fantastic resource.

They’re still in the process of adding different conditions to the list, so check back frequently for updates. If you have any further questions, you can contact one of their fantastic information officers via the Live Chat option on their website or by emailing info@mentalhealth.org.nz

Contact: Sophia Graham, senior communications officer at the Mental Health Foundation