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Tag Archives: Trauma

New Research Articles in Psychosis Journal

New articles available in Psychosis are online now on Taylor & Francis Online:

A qualitative study of refugees with psychotic symptoms
J.E. Rhodes, N.S. Parrett & O.J. Mason
DOI: 10.1080/17522439.2015.1045547

Does childhood bullying lead to the development of psychotic symptoms? A meta-analysis and review of prospective studies
Twylla Cunningham, Katrina Hoy & Ciaran Shannon
DOI: 10.1080/17522439.2015.1053969

Tales from the madhouse: an insider critique of psychiatric services
William Park
DOI: 10.1080/17522439.2015.1055784

Psychological approaches to understanding and treating auditory hallucinations: From theory to therapy
Lony Schiltz
DOI: 10.1080/17522439.2015.1049199

Together we stand in the bottomless pit – When trauma hits the therapeutic dyad
Y. Spinzy & G. Cohen-Rappaport
DOI: 10.1080/17522439.2015.1052007

Liverpool University Media Release

MEDIA RELEASE
BY LIVERPOOL UNIVERSITY
FEBRUARY 2014

Research led by a University of Liverpool psychologist has found strong support for the theory that early childhood trauma, such as abuse and neglect, could lead to the development of psychosis in later life.

An international team of researchers reviewed more than 120 reports on the biological mechanisms underlying the relationship between childhood trauma and psychosis.

They concluded that people experiencing psychosis should be offered evidence-based psychological therapies that address the social causes of their difficulties.

Anomalies in the brains of people diagnosed with mental health problems such as ‘schizophrenia’ have traditionally been used to support the notion that such problems are biologically based brain disorders that have little to do with life events.

Recent research, however, shows support for the ‘traumagenic neurodevelopmental’ model of psychosis, which suggests that those differences can be caused by adverse life events, especially those occurring in early childhood.

Professor John Read, from the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Psychology, Health and Society, said:

“Trauma based brain changes should not be thought of as being indicative of having a brain disorder or disease. The changes are reversible. Recent studies have found, for example, that the brain’s oversensitivity to stressors can be reduced by properly designed psychotherapy.

“The primary prevention implications are profound. Protection and nurturance of the developing brain in young children would seem to be of paramount importance.

“We hope that this vast body of literature will encourage more mental health staff to take more of an interest in the lives of the people they are trying to help, rather than viewing hearing voices and having unusual beliefs as mere symptoms of an ‘illness’ that need to be suppressed with medication.”

The review was published in Neuropsychiatry.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/full/10.2217/npy.13.89

Highlights from the Engage Facebook Page

Here are a few of the posts shared on the Engage Aotearoa Facebook Page in the last few weeks.

World Health Organisation Releases Guidelines on Mental Healthcare After Trauma

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has published some guidelines for health professionals on how to provide care to adults and children following a traumatic event.

The document cautions health providers about prescribing benzodiazepines in the month following trauma or loss, sharing research evidence that using benzo’s for acute stress symptoms and trauma-related sleeping problems can prolong recovery from the events and create dependency and tolerance that add to the individual’s difficulties.

Read a summary of the guidelines here.

Get the full report here.

Like Minds Newsletter for December 2013 is Online Now

The latest issue of the Like Minds Newsletter is available online now.

Inside Issue 54, December 2013: 

  • International anti-stigma campaigns and the Global Alliance Against Stigma meeting.
  • The winner of the reTHiNK Schizophrenia competition, James Allan and his winning billboard design.
  • Sonia Gray on why she decided to speak out about the discrimination she faced when applying for life insurance.
  • Lance Elliott has lived with schizophrenia for more than 20 years. He hopes to inspire other people with lived experience by sharing some of his story.
  • Natalie Roche, author of The Grand Optimist, explains her triumph over a series of traumatic life events.
  • Richard Towgood on how a bit of cheeky initiative and confidence allowed him to land a job.
  • The inaugural Mental Blocks grant recipients and their projects.