Engage Aotearoa

Category Archives: Information Sharing

Events, news and resources that aim to share information.

Taking part in the Mental Health and Addictions Inquiry

The Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction has been established by the New Zealand Government in response to widespread concern about mental health and addiction services in the mental health sector and the broader community. It’s time to have your say about what works, what doesn’t work, and what else is needed. Submissions are due by 5pm, 5 June 2018.

Anyone can make a submission to the Inquiry. Service-users, family members, and mental-health professionals have especially valuable perspectives to share. There are a number of different ways you can make your voice count.

  • Fill out the Inquiry Panel’s consultation document. You can do this online or on a downloaded form. The consultation document is like a short survey that asks the following questions…
    1. What is currently working well? Why do you think it is working well? Who is it working well for?
    2. What isn’t working well at the moment? What mental health and addiction needs are not currently being met? Who isn’t receiving the support they need and why? What is not being done now that should be?
    3. What could be done better?
    4. From your point of view, what sort of society would be best for the mental health of all our people?
    5. Anything else you want to tell us? 
  • Write your own submission and email this to the Inquiry Panel. They will consider all submissions received. You can use the questions in the consultation document or not, the choice is yours.
  • You can also provide your submission over the phone by calling 0800 644 678 between 9:30am and 5:30pm Monday to Friday. Someone will be able to talk to you and write down your ideas about how to improve mental health and addiction in New Zealand.
  • Finally, you can attend a regional community meeting to share your ideas directly with the panel. You can complete their Expression of Interest form so they can keep in touch with you when they have updates to share.

Contact the Mental Health and Addictions Inquiry

Website: www.mentalhealth.inquiry.govt.nz

Email: mentalhealth@inquiry.govt.nz

Phone:  0800 644 678

The Latest from the British Psychological Society

In case you missed it, on the 1st of February the Division of Clinical Psychology at the British Psychological Society published a new report that presents a different way of looking at mental-health problems,  The Power Threat Meaning Framework.

The announcement explains, “A group of senior psychologists (Lucy Johnstone, Mary Boyle, John Cromby, David Harper, Peter Kinderman, David Pilgrim and John Read) and high profile service user campaigners (Jacqui Dillon and Eleanor Longden) spent five years developing the Power Threat Meaning Framework as an alternative to more traditional models based on psychiatric diagnosis. They were supported by researcher Kate Allsopp, by a consultancy group of service users/carers, and by many people who supplied examples of good practice that is not based on diagnosis.”

You can read the full Power Threat Meaning Framework or a shorter overview.

Find the original announcement here.

The efficacy of a text messaging intervention for anxiety and depression among young people

One of Engage Aotearoa’s recovery resources, the Small Victories challenge, was included in the pilot of a text-messaging programme for young people with depression and anxiety at Youthline. The results of the evaluation were published last year in the Children and Youth Services Review.

Abstract
Background: Depression and anxiety are among the most commonly experienced mental health issues faced by young people in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Considerable barriers exist that prevent young people from engaging with face-to-face mental health services. Young people’s preference for technology-based counselling mediums such as text messaging opens up new pathways for intervention. Objective: A pilot text message-based intervention package was trialed for use by young people to evaluate the potential efficacy of the text package as an intervention for depression and anxiety symptoms.
Method: The text package was piloted using a 10-week longitudinal cohort pilot with 21 young participants (12– 24 years) who demonstrated mild to moderate anxiety and/or depression symptoms.
Results: Participants’ post-package scores were significantly lower than their pre-package scores for both anxiety (Z = −2.83, p = .005, r = −0.65) and depression (Z = −2.49, p = .013, r = −.056). ‘Feeling encouraged and supported’ increased as a result of receiving support from a trained supporter (Z = −2.06, p = .039, r = −0.45), but not from friends/family (Z = −1.72, p = .130, r = −0.37). Anxiety and depression scores did not change as a result of support from either trained supporters or friends/family.
Conclusions: Findings support the potential efficacy of the text package, justify wider trials of the text package, and support the use of text message-based interventions as potentially effective therapies for young people.

Read the full-text article by David Anstiss and Amber Davies here.

Transgender Awareness Week 2015: Nov 14-20

Transgender awareness week starts on November 14th and finishes up on November 20th, the ninth annual Trans Day of Remembrance.

Trans on Campus  from The University of Auckland, Rainbow Youth and GenderBridge (pdf), have teamed up to organised two Trans Awareness Week events in Auckland, including a one-day symposium, Transacademia.

Learn more for Transgender Awareness Week…

Inside Out

Rainbow Youth: Queer and Trans Info Pages

 

Matua Raki Workforce Innovation Awards Close 31 July

There are just two more weeks left to apply for the Matua Raki Workforce Innovation Awards

Share your workplace innovations that are improving wellbeing and staff engagement in addiction services. Examples of innovations include work-life initiatives, job or team re-designs that improve effective practice, staff contributions to improve service delivery, professional development initiatives and environmental innovations.

Applications are open until 31 July.

Find out more or download an entry form here

Mental Health Foundation Launches Mindfulness Posters

The Mental Health Foundation’s graphic designer Amy Mackinnon has created a series of posters that share the basic practices behind mindfulness. The A2 posters are available in a set of three from the Mental Health Foundation’s new webstore for $39 including postage and packaging.

Each sale is equivalent to the cost of one child in a low decile NZ school attending the Mental Health Foundation’s Pause, Breathe, Smile  eight-week mindfulness course. By purchasing these posters, you’re supporting the Mental Health Foundation to deliver mindfulness training to primary and intermediate students in their school classrooms nationwide.

Engage Consideration: Dutch initiative challenges mainstream thinking about psychosis

This post highlights a relatively new Dutch initiative that works to promote a helpful way of thinking about experiences of psychosis. The team at Engage Aotearoa recently stumbled across it on Facebook and thought it was full of information others might like to consider – either in their own recovery or in their efforts to support others seeking recovery.

Jim van Os and others have created a website, manifesto and set of audio-visual ‘explanimations’ to help people understand psychotic experiences in a way that allows for meaning-making and hope for recovery.

Much of the website is in Dutch, but an English-language version of the core resources on the “Schizophrenia Doesn’t Exist” website is available. It’s a provocative title, but the project creators do not mean to say that extreme experiences like hallucinations and delusions do not exist.

If you are not much for reading, you can watch Jim van Os’s TED Talk and get it all in a 15-minute nutshell or explore the 2-minute ‘explanimations‘ about psychosis and recovery on the website.

Visit the Schizophrenia Doesn’t Exist English-language webpage to find everything in one place. 

The Manifesto outlines “14 Principles for Good Care of Psychosis”. The first 7 principles address current thinking that frames psychosis as a brain disorder called schizophrenia and set out evidence for an alternative – Psychosis Spectrum Syndrome or PSS. The final 7 principles set out a vision for recovery-based practice, these state…

“8: To recover from PSS, a person must be offered hope and perspective from the very first moment. Recovery is a psychological process. It is a process of learning to adapt and develop a new perspective. With support from people with lived experience of psychosis and, where necessary, from doctors and therapists who support the process of recovery.

9: Every person with PSS should have access to a person with lived experience of psychosis from the earliest phase of treatment. A person with lived experience is in a unique position to offer perspective and hope (‘I was able to recover as well’).

10: The primary goal of treatment is return to the person’s environment, education and/or work. Education and work are prerequisites for recovery: even if residual symptoms remain, people can start picking up where they left off. The practice to wait for full recovery is counterproductive.

11: Anyone who enters the mental health system with PSS should be encouraged to talk about their psychosis. The content of the psychosis should be seen as meaningful, and may represent the key to underlying issues.

12: Psycho-education should not introduce an unproven biomedical model of brain disease as a central theme.

13: Anyone who suffers from psychosis should have access to psychotherapy by an experienced therapist.

14: Antipsychotics may be necessary to reduce psychosis but do not correct an underlying biological abnormality. Antipsychotics are no cure. Much more attention is required for individual dose optimisation to reach the lowest possible dose and to avoid irrational polypharmacy.

Schizophrenia does not exist, which is a good thing.
Because much can be done about PSS.”

~ Quoted from, Manifesto: 14 Principles for Good Care of Psychosis. Schizophrenia Does Not Exist website, 12 July 2015.

 

 

Five x $10K Media Grants up for Grabs

MEDIA RELEASE: 8 July 2015
Mental Health Foundation of NZ

Are you a journalist or a creative artist who wants to change attitudes towards mental distress?

Five grants worth up to $10,000 each are now available for three journalism and two creative projects focusing on mental health issues.

The Mental Health Foundation (MHF) welcomes project proposals from journalists, photojournalists and those freelancing in print, radio or TV media; as well as artists, creative writers, musicians, and performers. Journalism, photojournalism and creative students may also apply.

“A new survey shows New Zealanders are less accepting of mental illness than they are of sexuality and religion, so in 2015 we have up to $50,000 available thanks to ongoing sponsorship from the Frozen Funds Charitable Trust and support from the Like Minds, Like Mine national programme,” MHF chief executive Judi Clements says.

Read the full media release here.

The deadline for applications is the 2nd of September 2015.

Read this flyer to find out more.

To receive an application pack or for more information:
Contact Cate Hennessy, Media Grants Co-ordinator
Ph 021 687 426 or email info@mediagrants.org.nz

Sign up for the Mental Health Foundation’s E-Bulletin

The Mental Health Foundation of New Zealand’s latest weekly E-Bulletin was delivered to inboxes on the 24th of June. Delivered weekly, the E-Bulletin provides links to resources for researchers, academics, mental health workforce, people interested in new research, information and developments in the field of mental health and wellbeing.

Follow this link to subscribe to the E-Bulletin.

Have You Seen the Target Zero Documentary Yet? Watch Online

A very special documentary aired on Maori Television on the 15th of June. Target Zero highlights the need for suicide prevention strategies in NZ, Key to Life Charitable Trust‘s grassroots work across NZ, what gets people through and the solutions whanau and youth themselves are enacting in their schools and towns. IMG_0168

 

Engage Aotearoa would like to congratulate Mike King, Jo Methven, Tai Tupou and the rest of the Key to Life team on  the messages they have brought together in Target Zero. This is an inspiring example of what can come about when genuine people, with genuine passion, collaborate with their communities to fill community needs.

Watch Target Zero online here and share it on social media.

These are the kinds of ideas we need to be spreading.